Five species that ran out of luck last year

Five species that ran out of luck last year

Five species of mammals, reptiles and insects were declared extinct during 2016. They are:


 
The Rabb's Treefrog. Last seen in the wilds of Panama in 2007. A captive animal has lived at the Atlanta Botanical Garden in the USA for years, but he died late in September 2016. The species probably went extinct due to a deadly fungus that is killing amphibian populations in Central America.
 
The Bramble Cays Melomys. A rodent that lived on a small island off of Australia. The last one was seen in 2009. An intensive search effort in 2014 failed to turn one up. This extinction is being attributed to climate change. Sea level rises resulted in the island being inundated with water several times which killed animals and damaged their habitat.
 
The San Cristóbal Vermilion Flycatcher. A bird only known from the Galapagos Islands and not seen since 1987. The extinction of this bird was likely hastened by invasive rats. This was the first bird species to have gone extinct in the Galapagos, and naturalists did not realise it was a distinct species until it was gone.
 
The Stephan's Riffle Beetle and the Tatum Cave Beetle. Related species, which lived only in Arizona and Kentucky, USA. Human overdevelopment of their natural habitat can be blamed for their disappearance. Naturalists had called for their protection years ago, but no funding was made available.
 
The Barbados Racer. The last snake was seen in 1963. These snakes, once very common on the island, likely disappeared because they were eaten by an invasive species of mongoose, introduced in the nineteenth century. The destruction of the snake’s native forest habitat was also a significant factor.
 
For more about extinctions, see:
http://www.livingalongsidewildlife.com/2016/12/the-animals-that-went-extinct-in-2016.html
 

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